This Week’s Reading

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Despite saying nothing about the three (or four) musketeers in the title, The Vicomte de Bragelonne is indeed a Musketeer book. However, it takes place some thirty years after the events of young D’artagnan riding into Paris with the aspiration of becoming a musketeer. In the process, if you recall, D’artagnan offended three men who were already musketeers (Porthos, Athos, and Aramis) and made appointments to meet all three of them at the end of a sword.

Despite this rocky start, they became best of friends. But thirty years later they have gone their separate ways. This book is quite lengthy and actually contains three separate story arcs, the third of which doesn’t satisfactorily resolved. It was written in serial format, appearing between 1847 and 1850–and this is really just the first 93 chapters of 263. Because this book is continued in  Louise de la Vallière, and The Man in the Iron Mask.

Anyhow, this book is loaded with clever repartee, court intrigue, and derring-do. It’s hard to top the literary virtuosity of Dumas.

This is a comprehensive study of the life of Jesus Christ, the most important historical and spiritual figure since the world was formed. The book was enlightening on several counts. It goes into the Jewish society and customs of the day and this sheds understanding on a number of things Christ said during his ministry.

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The Royal Occultist: The Charnel Hounds

This story takes place before St. Cyprian meets his apprentice Ebe Gallowglass and when St. Cyprian is the mere apprentice for the previous Royal Occultist Thomas Carnacki.  There’s a lot of awesomeness packed into a very short tale: The trenches of the Great War, flesh-eating human/simian mongrels, and a Lewis Gun.

The Charnel Hounds is available through Josh Reynolds Patreon site.

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2 thoughts on “This Week’s Reading

  1. From your emails, it looks like you have some cool stuff coming out. I’m especially pumped about the next Crow book.

    Like

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